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Patient-Centred Consulting for the MRCGP: using the RCGP competences to improve your consulting

Amazon.co.uk Price: £26.59 (as of 10/11/2019 02:15 PST- Details)

Patient-Centred Consulting for the MRCGP: using the RCGP competences to improve your consulting

Amazon.co.uk Price: £26.59 (as of 10/11/2019 02:15 PST- Details)

This book aims to help readers develop a consulting style which focuses on the needs of the patient rather than resorting to a formulaic approach to questioning. It helps readers to display the competences required to pass the CSA exam. Using patient doctor dialogues, the reader is shown both positive and negative indicators for a broad array of consultation types. The reflective style used in the book will help the doctor identify which aspects of the competences tested in the examination they need to improve. The book will also help you to avoid these common problems: Disorganised or unstructured consultation Not recognising the issues or priorities Showing poor time management Not appearing to develop rapport or show awareness of patient’s agenda and preferences Poor active listening skills and use of cues Not developing a shared plan Not using language that is relevant and understandable to the patient The book is structured with the patient, rather than the disease, at the centre of the consultation, in keeping with the design of the CSA examination. The style of writing is aimed at encouraging self-learning, to avoid readers picking up formulaic habits. Patient-Centred Consulting for the MRCGP brings together lifelike patient doctor dialogues with the RCGP competency framework. It will help improve your daily consultations through a reflective understanding of the skills required to put the patient first. Contents: 1 Introduction 2 Why it’s difficult to pass the CSA without developing fluency in patient-centredness 3 Understanding the skills assessed in the CSA 4 How to understand the patient’s perspective without using formulaic questions 5 Achieving patient-centredness regardless of the nature of the clinical problem 6 The patient’s understanding and experience 7 Managing uncertainty, sharing risks 8 How to use the patient’s perspective to find a practical solution 9 Data gathering to develop understanding of the problem and the patient simultaneously 10 Offering management options using the patient’s understanding 11 Dealing with a specialist clinical problem using patient-centredness 12 Discovering the reason for a patient’s attendance 13 Mutually agreed plan using the patient’s perspective 14 Making ethical decisions using patient-centredness 15 Building the history around the patient’s experience 16 Undifferentiated problems and dealing with uncertainty 17 The patient’s uniqueness 18 Understanding the patient’s preferences 19 Problem solving using the patient’s perspectives 20 Are hidden agendas the unexplored views of patients? 21 Making decisions using the patient’s understanding 22 Discovering the reason for patient attendance using active listening 23 Improving time management using the patient’s understanding 24 Patient perspective elicited later in the consultation 25 Health beliefs 26 Impact of the problem and the influence on decisions 27 Dealing with discordance and the patient’s health beliefs 28 The patient’s views 29 Shared understanding, shared thoughts 30 Encouraging the patient’s contribution to improve explanations 31 The patient’s context 32 Discovering the decision that the patient has attended to resolve 33 Dealing with vague symptoms using patient-centredness 34 Mutual negotiation 35 Dealing with a discordant request 36 Reassuring patients 37 Explaining a diagnosis using the patient’s understanding 38 Checking the patient’s understanding References

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This book aims to help readers develop a consulting style which focuses on the needs of the patient rather than resorting to a formulaic approach to questioning. It helps readers to display the competences required to pass the CSA exam. Using patient doctor dialogues, the reader is shown both positive and negative indicators for a broad array of consultation types. The reflective style used in the book will help the doctor identify which aspects of the competences tested in the examination they need to improve. The book will also help you to avoid these common problems: Disorganised or unstructured consultation Not recognising the issues or priorities Showing poor time management Not appearing to develop rapport or show awareness of patient’s agenda and preferences Poor active listening skills and use of cues Not developing a shared plan Not using language that is relevant and understandable to the patient The book is structured with the patient, rather than the disease, at the centre of the consultation, in keeping with the design of the CSA examination. The style of writing is aimed at encouraging self-learning, to avoid readers picking up formulaic habits. Patient-Centred Consulting for the MRCGP brings together lifelike patient doctor dialogues with the RCGP competency framework. It will help improve your daily consultations through a reflective understanding of the skills required to put the patient first. Contents: 1 Introduction 2 Why it’s difficult to pass the CSA without developing fluency in patient-centredness 3 Understanding the skills assessed in the CSA 4 How to understand the patient’s perspective without using formulaic questions 5 Achieving patient-centredness regardless of the nature of the clinical problem 6 The patient’s understanding and experience 7 Managing uncertainty, sharing risks 8 How to use the patient’s perspective to find a practical solution 9 Data gathering to develop understanding of the problem and the patient simultaneously 10 Offering management options using the patient’s understanding 11 Dealing with a specialist clinical problem using patient-centredness 12 Discovering the reason for a patient’s attendance 13 Mutually agreed plan using the patient’s perspective 14 Making ethical decisions using patient-centredness 15 Building the history around the patient’s experience 16 Undifferentiated problems and dealing with uncertainty 17 The patient’s uniqueness 18 Understanding the patient’s preferences 19 Problem solving using the patient’s perspectives 20 Are hidden agendas the unexplored views of patients? 21 Making decisions using the patient’s understanding 22 Discovering the reason for patient attendance using active listening 23 Improving time management using the patient’s understanding 24 Patient perspective elicited later in the consultation 25 Health beliefs 26 Impact of the problem and the influence on decisions 27 Dealing with discordance and the patient’s health beliefs 28 The patient’s views 29 Shared understanding, shared thoughts 30 Encouraging the patient’s contribution to improve explanations 31 The patient’s context 32 Discovering the decision that the patient has attended to resolve 33 Dealing with vague symptoms using patient-centredness 34 Mutual negotiation 35 Dealing with a discordant request 36 Reassuring patients 37 Explaining a diagnosis using the patient’s understanding 38 Checking the patient’s understanding References

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